Sunday, 10 April 2016

High-Rise (2016)

Plot:
Dr. Robert Laing (Tom Hiddleston) has just moved into a new high-rise apartment where the 'teething problems' and the social inequality make life increasingly chaotic.

Review:
I've been a bit lazy/unmotivated in the past few days (read: couple of weeks) when it comes to reviews. I saw this film just over two weeks ago but haven't been able to bring myself round to reviewing it, despite not having too much to say on it. That's probably because I have other bits of work I know I have to do (and, indeed, did eventually do) but don't really want to and so I end up doing nothing but lolling around my flat being unproductive (this isn't helped by there being no new films available for me to see last weekend). But let's finally get this one out of the way...

This is one of those cases where you might come out of the film and stating that the film was 'interesting' but didn't really work for you. In other words, you though the film was trying to do something but you were a little too uninvolved about it to care. And that is more or less my stance towards this.

Taking a quick glance at the film, it isn't hard to see that the life in the tower is some representation of society, the the class tiers and such. Interesting enough though I did enjoy more how 'Snowpiercer' went about tackling the same kind of subject. Especially as it didn't suddenly break down in incomprehensible madness. Which I know is meant to be the point with the story in 'High-Rise', it was more that the transition here didn't fit convincingly (it wouldn't be the first time director Ben Wheatley has done this). Nor did it feel very rewarding to watch any of it.

But that's not to say the film is without it moments. It can be enjoyably darkly comic at points and chunks of it are scenes and details that engage. And there is a solid cast to give something to the chaos. But, when it's all thrown together as it is, it doesn't amount to much and simplistically seems to think that by just going bananas it justifies its own existence.

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